Muslim group welcome hero firefighters to a dinner to celebrate mosque’s 30th anniversary

  • Ahmadiyya Muslim Australia welcomed members from the NSW RFS for dinner
  • Baitul Huda mosque in Sydney’s west celebrated its 30th anniversary on Sunday
  • Firefighters attended the event, along with community members and politicians  

A Muslim group welcomed firefighters to a dinner to celebrate a mosque’s 30th anniversary.

Ahmadiyya Muslim Australia (AMA) invited the NSW crew to the Baitul Huda mosque in Marsden Park in Sydney’s west as part of the celebrations on Saturday. 

Members of the NSW Rural Fire Service attended the event, along with community members, politicians and members of the general public.

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Australia group welcomed New South Wales firefighters for dinner to celebrate a mosque's 30th anniversary

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Australia group welcomed New South Wales firefighters for dinner to celebrate a mosque’s 30th anniversary

The Baitul Huda mosque in Marsden Park in Sydney's west celebrated its 30th anniversary on Saturday (pictured during the celebration)

The Baitul Huda mosque in Marsden Park in Sydney’s west celebrated its 30th anniversary on Saturday (pictured during the celebration)

The Muslim group posted images of the event on Twitter, thanking the firefighters for their service.

‘Thanks NSW RFS for the wonderful work you do day and night,’ it wrote.

‘Thanks for attending our 30 years of Masjid Baitul Huda with outstanding exhibition to educate community & encourage our youth to become volunteers & service this beautiful country.’

Images show firetrucks sitting outside the mosque as volunteers from the RFS are pictured eating dinner and listening to key speakers at the event.

The Baitul Huda mosque accommodates the Sydney community of Ahmadiyya Muslims, an Islamic denomination, The Daily Telegraph reported.

There are more than 4,000 members of the denomination in Sydney with the Baitul Huda mosque becoming one of the country’s biggest.

Members of the NSW Rural Fire Service attended the event, along with community members, politicians and members of the general public

Members of the NSW Rural Fire Service attended the event, along with community members, politicians and members of the general public

Imam and missionary, Imtiaz Ahmad Naveed said the group was formally formed in 1979 but has more than 100 years of history in Australia.

The group focuses on bridging the gap between communities through interfaith discussion.

‘We regularly host interfaith symposiums, charity work, open mosque events, Australia Day and many more,’ Mr Naveed said.

‘We regularly have visits from several different schools; primary schools, high schools, colleges and some university students and local communities.’

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